A Photo Tour of Ancient Ephesus

A Photo Tour of Ancient Ephesus

I know I can’t be alone when I say I feel like there’s a certain electricity that you can only find in historic places. It’s like you transcend time; you touch all of the centuries at once, you are one with the hundreds, thousands, millions of other people who have stood at that same spot and looked at the same view. Maybe I’m just a history nerd…but I truly, deeply believe there is something in the air in old places. You just have to be open to feeling it and you’ll find it’s all around you, absorbing you.

Imagine the vibes I got stepping foot in Ephesus, one of the best preserved ancient cities in the whole world. Built in the 10th century BC (seriously think about that for a second…the 10th century BC), it was a Greek city until 129 BC when the Romans took over and it’s estimated that 34,000-56,000 people resided there during it’s most prosperous period! Given the fact that it is so well preserved, complete with a huge amphitheater, multiple temples, residential areas, and a two-story library facade, it really is like entering another world. You don’t need to stretch your imagination too much to picture what this city was like in its prime.

I’m going to let the pictures do the talking for me. Simply put, it was a breathtaking experience that I could not recommend more for anyone visiting Turkey. Even if you don’t plan on spending a lot of time in Izmir…Ephesus is too magnificent to miss. I was walking around like a freak touching all of the walls picturing the literal MILLENNIA that those stones have seen, wondering who else had placed their hands on those exact spots…it’s an emotional and humbling experience that I don’t think anyone should miss. Nothing is more humanizing than finding a connection with people who lived thousands of years ago.

One word of advice: If you visit during summer as we did, BE PREPARED. We didn’t bring water with us which was so extraordinarily stupid. It was very hot, very crowded, and there is minimal shade, plus to see the whole city you have to walk up a fairly long hillside. We were so hot and dehydrated we actually spent a good five minutes debating drinking water from a bottle we found on the ground whose seal had been broken…not ok.

The amazing, massive amphitheater. We entered it through tunnels the performers used to use.EphesusEphesusEphesusEphesusEphesusEphesusEphesusFirst look at the iconic Ephesus library facade. Think of how many minds passed through those doors, ready to learn.EphesusEphesusEphesusEphesusEphesusAnd here’s the inside of the library.
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EphesusThis one below is where their market was held daily. We learned thousands would gather here to buy and sell goods.
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EphesusThese are interiors of the wealthiest people’s homes. Can I reiterate that being here felt like transcending time?
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Have you been to Ephesus or any other ancient city? What was your experience like?

  • Breathtaking! That library is incredible! I had the same feeling you describe here when we visited Pompei, it was unbelievable to be able to walk through the so well preserved streets and buildings.

    • Thank you! And yes the library was my favorite, I took wayyyyyy too many practically identical pictures of it haha oops! But I would LOVE to go to Pompei! I bet it’s even crazier there, because life there literally just froze in time. I’m getting goosebumps just thinking about it!

  • Hima

    This is so beautiful! It’s incredible how the architecture was so intricate that long ago! Now it’s easy because we have all the tools and technology, but imagine how much work went into each panel of the library facade! I totally felt like this in Pompeii and when we visited the Colosseum in Rome. You could imagine people going through their lives so easily. I felt like it was a reminder of historical magic and eerie tragedy, opening a window to the ingenuity of the human race 2000 years ago while serving as a reminder of the overwhelming power of nature.

    wow ok that was a lot